Migrating from Ghost to Hugo

So I recently migrated this site from Ghost to Hugo after reading a nice article about the Hugo in Linux Voice #20 (funnily enough, the same issue also features an article about Ghost). I originally made the switch to Ghost from Jekyll back in 2014 or so mainly because I could not find a good theme to use. Ghost also seemed to have a lot of cool features and it’s fun to try new things.

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Set refresh rate of screen from script

Getting a great new 100 Hz Ultra Wide monitor does not come without its share of tweaking. So it turns out that the refresh you set on your monitor in Nvidia settings (as explained in a previous post does not apply to all the display ports. They apparently count as different screens with different settings or something. So, here’s a handy script which you can add to your window manager’s autostart applications to set the refresh rate and resolution of your screen, regardless of which actual port you use: #!/bin/bash -eu RES="3440x1440" RR="100" # Do for every output, so that it doesn't matter where you plug in # your monitor.

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Fixing the up button in Python shell history

In case your python/ipython shell doesn’t have a working history, e.g. pressing ↑ only prints some nonsensical ^[[A, then you are missing either the readline or ncurses library. Ipython is more descriptive that something is wrong, but if you’re in the habit of mostly using python as a quick calculator, you might never notice: If you’re using Miniconda then just do: conda install ncurses readline And ↑ should work:

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Nvidia G-Sync and Linux

After getting a fancy new monitor with G-Sync support, I was eager to try it out in my Linux gaming setup. While Nvidia fully supports G-Sync in their Linux drivers, it turns out that other components of the system can get in the way. As explained by a post on the Nvidia forums: For G-SYNC to work, the application has to be able to flip and the symptoms you’re describing here sound like it’s not able to flip in your configuration.

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Encrypt a BTRFS RAID5-array in-place

When I decided I needed more disk space for media and virtual machine (VM) images, I decided to throw some more money at the problem and get three 3TB hard drives and run BTRFS in RAID5. It’s still somewhat experimental, but has proven very solid for me. RAID5 means that one drive can completely fail, but all the data is still intact. All one has to do is insert a new drive and the drive will be reconstructed.

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